Last edited by Yozshurg
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

5 edition of Shakespeare"s hand in the play of Sir Thomas More found in the catalog.

Shakespeare"s hand in the play of Sir Thomas More

Alfred William Pollard

Shakespeare"s hand in the play of Sir Thomas More

by Alfred William Pollard

  • 397 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by University P. in Cambridge .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Autographs.,
  • Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Authorship.,
  • More, Thomas, Sir, Saint, 1478-1535 -- In literature.,
  • Sir Thomas More (Drama)

  • Edition Notes

    Bound with the author"s Shakespeare"s fight with the pirates and the problems of the transmission of his text. Cambridge, 1967.

    Statementpapers by Alfred W. Pollard [and others].
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPR3071 .P6 1967
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, [243] p.
    Number of Pages243
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5673791M
    LC Control Number68135739

      Sir Thomas More lay unpublished as a manuscript for about two hundred years, then receiving a publication as Shakespeare in book form. The play was a collaboration between several authors, and several portions of it were subjected to censorship/5(9).   Still, the one dramatic document that is often said to be in Shakespeare’s own handwriting—the text of a play called Sir Thomas More that was begun in Author: David Scott Kastan.

    One more example, however, does deserve to be mentioned here, at least in passing. Sir Thomas More (or The Book of Sir Thomas More) is a play on the famous Lord Chancellor under Henry VIII. It is known from a manuscript now in the British Library. William Shakespeare (also spelled Shakspere, Shaksper, and Shake-speare, because spelling in Elizabethan times was not yet fixed and absolute) was born in Stratford-upon-Avon in Warwickshire, England in April William was the son of John Shakespeare, a successful tradesman and alderman, and of Mary Arden, a daughter of the gentry.

    Last week, we posted on how scholars have tried to recover the original pronunciations of Shakespeare’s plays and poems when performed on the stage. Today, we bring you the bard’s original handwriting. Shakespeare’s handwriting has recently become the focus of a new article by Professor Douglas Bruster at UT Austin, who is using an analysis of the playwright’s quirky spellings and. No Shakespeare playscript, though, has ever been found. (Part of the manuscript of a play about Sir Thomas More has been attributed to Shakespeare, but the part is small and the attribution contentious.) We do, however, know a few things about Shakespeare’s relationship with books.


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Shakespeare"s hand in the play of Sir Thomas More by Alfred William Pollard Download PDF EPUB FB2

‘The Book of Sir Thomas More’ is the only surviving literary manuscript in Shakespeare’s hand. Here Andrew Dickson describes how the scene Shakespeare wrote for the play contains a moving plea for the plight of immigrants.

Shakespeare's Hand in Sir Thomas More by Since the s, Shakespeare scholars have suspected that one of the hands ("Hand D") in the manuscript Elizabethan play Sir Thomas More is that of William Shakespeare.

Over the years, enough evidince has been accumulated that most scholars today believe that Hand D is indeed Shakespeare's. Sir Thomas More is a collaboratively written play that survives only in a single manuscript.

The play is thought to have been written primarily by Anthony Munday, perhaps, some scholars think, aided by Henry Chettle, in the s, with somewhat later contributions from Thomas Dekker, perhaps from William Shakespeare, and just possibly from Thomas Heywood.

Shakespeare's Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More by Alfred William Pollard,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.2/5(1). William Shakespeare 's handwriting is known from six surviving signatures, all of which appear on legal documents.

It is believed by many scholars that the three pages of the handwritten manuscript of the play Sir Thomas More are also in William Shakespeare's handwriting.

4 Handwriting analysis. OCLC Number: Credits: 'Object of this book is to strengthen the evidence of the existence in the Harleian Ms.

at the British Museum of three pages written by Shakespeare in his own hand as part of the play of Sir Thomas More'. COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

This dark day in history, known as Evil May Day, was portrayed in a then-banned play called The Book of Sir Thomas More, believed to be written between and William Shakespeare and two Author: Anne Quito. This publication supports the claim that three pages of the British Museum's manuscript of Sir Thomas More were written in Shakespeare's own hand.

With contributions by five leading bibliographers, this book presents ample evidence for the case through careful analysis of palaeography, writing style and thematic : Paperback.

Shakespeare's Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More: Papers (Bol1 Pr English Literature) [Pollard, Alfred W.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Shakespeare's Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More: Papers (Bol1 Pr English Literature)Cited by: 9.

First published inthis book consists of a series of papers written by Pollard, W. Greg, E. Maunde Thompson, J. Dover Wilson, and R. Chambers, all advocates of the then newly-established New Bibliography. The book was assembled with the intention of strengthening the argument that Price: $   The last surviving play script handwritten by William Shakespeare, in which he imagines Sir Thomas More making an impassioned plea for the humane treatment of.

The play The Book of Sir Thomas More contains a series of scenes covering the events of the May Day riots ofwithin the period covered by this project. Immigrants from Lombardy in Northern Italy are being threatened by Londoners who accuse them of taking jobs and money from the locals, and want them to be deported back to where they came from.

Shakespeare’s unfinished play Sir Thomas More was not accepted as the Bard’s until relatively recently. It’s now generally conceded to be his handiwork – in fact, it’s the only play to exist in his own hand (apparently the scholarly consensus seems to agree that it is indeed his handwriting).

In order to assess the claims of Hand D-plus of Sir Thomas More to be Shakespeare’s, Elliott and Valenza derived from their core Shakespeare plays a sample of ninety verse blocks of about words each, roughly the size of the verse portion of “Hand D-plus,” which includes “Addition III,” More’s soliloquy, which is actually in the scribal “Hand C.” They discovered that, on.

This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Full text of "Shakespeare's hand in the play of Sir Thomas More; papers by Alfred W. Pollard [and others] With the text of Ill May day scenes" See other formats.

Plot Summary. Sir Thomas More is a play with multiple authors that was heavily censored by the Master of the Revels and is believed to have never been performed at the time.

One scene and one monologue are believed to have been written by Shakespeare. The one scene – More quieting a riot – is particularly notable as it is the only example of a manuscript by Shakespeare that we have. Sir Thomas More is a play written by several playwrights, including Shakespeare.

The original text was written by Anthony Munday and Henry Chettle. It was not performed until much later as the master of revels, as censor, regarded it as politically dangerous due to the scenes depicting rioting in the streets of London.

Other writers eventually. Scholarly interest in The Book of Sir Thomas More has concentrated on the issue of Shakespeare's contribution to its revision. The play, which concerns the life of Sir Thomas More, was written insubjected to censorship by the Master of the Revels and revised by a group of playwrights which probably included Shakespeare.

lines have been claimed as Shakespeare's. The play Sir Thomas More was not written by Shakespeare, but it seems he added some of his own touches and revisions to it, so it was included in the reading schedule Im using to read through everything Shakespeare wrote in one year.

This play focuses on Mores wisdom in resolving social and legal problems. He subdues a riot with persuasive words/5.Sir Thomas More, a play Shakespeare collaborated on, is back in the news, especially as it resonates with the crisis of human refuge and survival that mark our present Ian McKellen, who has a long association with the play, has recited More’s “the strangers’ case” at several events.It’s generally agreed that Shakespeare wrote 37 plays between and In addition to these 37 plays there is one ‘lost’ play – Cardenio – plus a selection of plays that it’s belived Shakespeare collaborated on, such as Love’s Labour’s Won, Edward III, Sir .